not games

Jul 18

“Attempting to rigorously define interactivity is about as joyous as rigorously defining the word game into your preferred pigeon hole. You might see healthy debate in this conversation. I see a black hole event horizon through which my will to live is disappearing.” — Joel Goodwin
http://www.electrondance.com/screw-your-walking-simulators/

Jul 17

[video]

Jul 15

[video]

Jul 10

bientotlete:

Recreate Marcel Duchamp’s lost chess set with your 3D printer 
(via Engadget)

download the models here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:305639

bientotlete:

Recreate Marcel Duchamp’s lost chess set with your 3D printer
(via Engadget)

download the models here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:305639

Jul 09

“When you’re on Twitter, you only have to listen to people if you like what they think and say. You choose and curate a community that behaves in accordance with your beliefs, and within your community tiny issues loom large, warp and devour the world. In that twisted little info-tube that each of us siphons, we forget that these curated realities, with tidal waves of static and noise constantly rattling, are not real.” — Leigh Alexander
http://gamasutra.com/view/news/220443/There_is_nothing_to_do_in_OReillys_Mountain__and_thats_a_good_thing.php

“Absent an ability to reject this structure of exploitation, we find it easier to relabel the exploited, to give them enchanted laurels of cultural significance in acknowledgement that there very likely won’t be any other kind of compensation.” — Michael Thomsen
http://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelthomsen/2014/06/17/born-to-sell-how-indie-games-went-mainstream-at-e3/

“The fantasy of an “indie” culture of game design is ultimately not about aesthetics or representation but a desire to see the market structure itself proven viable in a time when all indicators point toward its doom.” — Michael Thomsen
http://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelthomsen/2014/06/17/born-to-sell-how-indie-games-went-mainstream-at-e3/

“Even if they haven’t signed a contract, the form of their product, the volume of labor required to produce it, guarantees whatever success they have will be owned by the market system, be it Valve, Apple, Microsoft, or Sony.” — Michael Thomsen
http://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelthomsen/2014/06/17/born-to-sell-how-indie-games-went-mainstream-at-e3/

“As has been the case in every industry of mass produced culture, the “indie” is inevitably just a tributary to a bigger market, less a correction to what is broken than an extension of it, ennobling the entrepreneurial at the most intimate levels.” — Michael Thomsen
http://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelthomsen/2014/06/17/born-to-sell-how-indie-games-went-mainstream-at-e3/

Jul 08

A plea for openness

Now that there’s so much willingness, technology and skill to create beautiful virtual worlds, it’s disappointing how many videogames cling to obstacle-based designs. As if players have to earn the privilege to explore by passing an irrelevant test. Now is the time to open up this medium, to let go of our affections and addictions, of our loyalty to childhood memories, to open up the beauty of videogames for the world to see.

Everybody wants to visit our worlds, to interact with our characters, to play a role in our stories. Don’t let them down! Give them access. Let design mean the building of bridges and the opening of doors, not the hiding of keys and the cowardly sniper shot. Welcome the player with open arms, be an entertaining host. Don’t pull the rug from under them or harass them just because you enjoy that sort of thing.

I admit I’m being selfish. I see so many alluring worlds in videogames. I really want to visit them but virtually without fail, it takes less than five minutes to run into an obstacle that I don’t have the heart to overcome. An enemy, a platform, a puzzle or a simple pit. The game promises hours of exploration but forces me to quit at the very start. These days I spend more time buying and downloading games than playing them. I want to play. Please help!

People —like me— want to see your creation, we are interested in what you have invented. Don’t shut us out. Don’t turn your new friends away. Be nice.

—Michaël Samyn.

(Source: notgames.org)